Commit c9a7e294 authored by Carla Barquest's avatar Carla Barquest

added a couple more quotes

parent 9a62f601
......@@ -16,4 +16,15 @@ Wagenfeld was in effect advocating an objective design-driven approach to manufa
Rams went on to add that he understood the importance of, and thus cultivated the relationship with, the technical department, taking great care to convince the technicians that the designers were not there to take their work away from them but to support them. [p47]
Lubs was greatly inspired by the Braun design environment. He describes the work atmosphere in the early 1960s as being 'very serious but with lots of energy'. The department, he adds, was like an apartment: 'you had to ring a doorbell to come in'. The team worked very hard at their individual projects, but communication between them was constant, so there was little need for group discussions. Although Rams was the boss, remembers Lubs, everyone else had a voice. The studio appears to have been rather like a college workshop. 'If Dieter did not like something, he would say, "Is that good?" or "Do you think it is finished?",' he recalls. 'After work the team socialized together as well,' he adds, 'bringing along their girlfriends, going out for drinks, to listen to jazz, celebrating birthdays together ... The company had a hierarchy but it was also open house. There was constant discussion, taking and giving, we were all filled with the same goal.' [p50]
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Lubs was greatly inspired by the Braun design environment. He describes the work atmosphere in the early 1960s as being 'very serious but with lots of energy'. The department, he adds, was like an apartment: 'you had to ring a doorbell to come in'. The team worked very hard at their individual projects, but communication between them was constant, so there was little need for group discussions. Although Rams was the boss, remembers Lubs, everyone else had a voice. The studio appears to have been rather like a college workshop. 'If Dieter did not like something, he would say, "Is that good?" or "Do you think it is finished?",' he recalls. 'After work the team socialized together as well,' he adds, 'bringing along their girlfriends, going out for drinks, to listen to jazz, celebrating birthdays together ... The company had a hierarchy but it was also open house. There was constant discussion, taking and giving, we were all filled with the same goal.' [p50]
It takes a considerable degree of doggedness and conviction to follow the ungratifying and difficult path of insisting on a consistently long-term view in a corporate world that is constantly shifting and full of short-term decisions. [p51]
'We are economical with form and colour, prioritize simple forms, avoid unnecessary complexity, do without ornament. Instead [there is] order and clarification. We measure every detail against the question of whether it serves function and facilitates handling.' [p52]
'...the basic intention behind my design: simplicity, essentiality and openness. The objects do not boast about themselves, take centre stage or restrict but withdraw into the background. Their reduction and unobtrusiveness generate space. The orderliness is not restrictive but liberating. In a world which is filling up at a disconcerting pace, that is destructively loud and visually confusing, design has the task in my view to be quiet, to help generate a level of calm that allows people to come to themselves. The contra position to this is a design that strongly stimulates, that wants to draw attention to itself and arouse strong emotions. For me this is inhumane because it adds in its way to the chaos that confuses, numbs and lames us.' [p141]
In 1957 a young physics student called Otto Zapf (b. 1931) was looking for ways in which to improve his father's modestly sized furniture-making business in Eschborn (near Frankfurt). ... Rams recalls that Zapf turned up with a portfolio of furniture designs by the architect Rolf Schmidt under his arm, opened it up and asked Rams what he thought. Rams said that, first of all, the prototype photographs were of poor quality and offered to come around and reshoot them with Marlene Schnelle, a good friend of his and Braun's in-house photographer at the time. [p187]
Much to his surprise, when Dieter Rams went to his boss Erwin Braun in 1957 and asked for permission to design furniture for Zapf in addition to his work at Braun, the response was immediate and positive. 'It was not usual in those days when you were employed by a company to work externally for someone else as well,' recalls Rams, 'but Erwin Braun thought it was a good idea. I can still hear his words: "LetRams make furniture, it will be good for our radios".' But there was considerable resistance to the idea within the company from colleagues and technicians. 'He [Erwin] was the only one to think outside the box and see that it could only be an advantage. Without his support I would never have been able to do it,' says Rams. Erwin was already a firm believer in an integrated approach to modern life and design. Perhpas he also understood that allowing his valuable young designer this 'hobby' outside of the company would help to keep him at Braun in the long term. [p188]
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